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Grinding in Sweden (Warning: very photo heavy)

Discussion in 'Get togethers, Tastings, Restaurant Openings, Etc' started by Anton, May 16, 2017.

  1. Last weekend Robin Dalman welcomed us in his workshop for a grind in. Apart from endless knives related talks, the main purpose was to learn knife making. I took some photos, so here's how it looked

    Robin welcomes us in his shop
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    Just unpacked package from Taiwan. Cleavers were everywhere in the shop.

    Plan for the two days and some branding ideas
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    Some very expensive knives blanks in stainless
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    Unfortunately Robin hasn't allowed me to use it for my first knife :)

    Templates that Robin is using for grinding
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    Each of us got two pieces of carbon steel. One 210mm gyuto, and the other is 175mm mini-gyuto. This is how it looked when we arrived.
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    And here are 2 pieces that I got. You can see profiles scribed on the steel. Our first step was to cut profiles using band saw and grinder.
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    Band sawing
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    And grinding on a 60grit ceramic belts. This thing cuts steel like butter
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    I'm intolerant to sharp spines/choils/tangs, so I used files to quickly ease everything
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    After cutting the profiles, it was time to put makers mark
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    I wasn't fully satisfied with the stamps, so decided to do some chisel work. My makers mark ended up being too big and I had to alter grind later to save it.
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    Then it was time to put pre HT grind.
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    The end results looked something like this:
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    After rough grind it was time for HT. We applied thin layer of special clay
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    Baking some steel
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    Oil and water to play with
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    While blades were annealing, we started making handles.
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    Most of us have chosen Masur birch, reindeer for ferrule and birch bark for spacers. Lathe was used to shape handles and fit ferrule. I haven't took any pictures of the process itself, so here's only the picture of how handle looked while gluing.
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    While we were making handles, blades were ready after HT.
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    One out of four blades survived water quench without cracks, but it was bent so needed some work.
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    And then it was time to final grind. It was the most time consuming part. Each of us spent several hours near grinder.
    Robin explained us his method and we tried to replicate it. With mixed success :)
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    There were about 10 full hours of work in the shop on day one. And here's what we had at the end of day
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    We couldn't finish two knives in 2 days, so we took the risk of water quench big blades for hamon. And if it cracks, then we finish small blade (which were oil quenched). So we woke up early next day and continued making sparks.

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    Then we shaped handles and started polishing blades
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    EDM stones allowed to put a decent polish in less than one hour. I wasn't trying to make it perfect, just good enough, so mine looked like this
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    Polishing blade
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    Fitting handle
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    My handle after polishing and putting coat of oil
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    And then it's sharpening time.
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    Happy participants with their knives
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    Overall it was an awesome experience and I'm super grateful to Robin for making this.
    Maybe others will add some more pictures and share their experience :)
     
  2. Thanks for posting this, Anton! A real pity I couldn't be there.
     
  3. MattS

    MattS Founding Member

    Nice, I saw these on your IG last night. Looks like fun. Ultimate question, how do they cut?
     
  4. cheflarge

    cheflarge Founding Member

    Looks like an awesome time......... WAY COOL!!! :jump:pop:jump
     
  5. Great pics Anton, looks like you had great fun.
     
  6. MotoMike

    MotoMike Founding Member

  7. I haven't tried them all, just mine and Matthew's. Mine wasn't impressive during my first testingā€¦ either because there was some beer involved, or because of poor sharpening. However I put a proper edge on it today and it performed pretty well. I cut some potatoes and there was no cracking or wedging. The only issue seems to be food releaseā€¦
    But for the first knife I couldn't be happier :)
     
  8. XooMG

    XooMG Founding Member

    Glad you all had a good time, and glad my package arrived in time for you to pick up that muteki.
     
  9. Dave Martell

    Dave Martell Professional Craftsman Founding Member

    Hell I had a good time just looking at the pictures! I love the stool of belt fuzz. :D

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  10. Toothpick

    Toothpick #2 since day #1 Founding Member

  11. Haha yea running water had stopped working, good timing.
     
  12. Some more porn videos from the meeting. Grinding pre HT:


    HT theory:


    and practice:
     
  13. You guys must really have had a great time :)!
     
  14. Few additional pictures from another lucky participant:

    The surroundings of the workshop

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    The building of the workshop
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    Some radom beauty in the shop:
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    Some people at work:
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    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  15. Nice shots, Matthew!
     

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